July Enrollment 2022 Course Information

High School Course List:


Course Name Total Credits
Creative Writing 5 Credits (1 Semester)
English 9 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
English 10 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
English 11 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
English 12 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Expository Writing 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Algebra I 10 Credits ( 2 Semesters)
Algebra II 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Financial Algebra 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Geometry 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Integrated Math I 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Integrated Math II 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Integrated Math III 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Precalculus 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Statistics and Probability 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Biology 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Chemistry 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Earth Science 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Environmental Studies 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Physical Science 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Physics 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Economics 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Ethnic Studies 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Geography and World Cultures 5 Credits (1 Semester)
U.S. Government and Politics 5 Credits (1 Semester)
U.S. History 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
World History 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Spanish I 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Spanish II 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Spanish III 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
French I 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
French II 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Art Appreciation 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Music Appreciation 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Physical Education I 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Physical Education II 10 Credits (2 Semesters)
Health Education 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Psychology 5 Credits (1 Semester)
Sociology 5 Credits (1 Semester)

High School Course Descriptions:


  • Creative Writing

    • Description: Creative Writing is an English elective course that focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing. Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to specific detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In the poetry units, students learn about the use of sensory details and imagery, figurative language, and sound devices including rhyme, rhythm and alliteration. They also explore poetic forms ranging from found poems and slam poetry to traditional sonnets and villanelles. In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to emphasize the writing craft of a diverse group of authors. Students study short stories by authors such as Bharati Mukherjee and Edgar Allan Poe, learning how to create believable characters and develop setting and plot. Likewise, students read poetry by canonical greats such as W. B. Yeats and Emily Dickinson as well as contemporary writers such as Pablo Neruda, Sherman Alexie, and Alice Notley. Studying the writing technique of a range of authors provides students with models and inspiration as they develop their own voices and refine their understanding of the literary craft. By taking a Creative Writing course, students find new approaches to reading and writing that can affect them on a personal level, as the skills they gain in each lesson directly benefit their own creative goals. Students who are already actively engaged writers and readers learn additional tools and insight into the craft of writing to help them further hone their skills and encourage their creative as well as academic growth.
  • English 9

    • Description: The English 9 course is an overview of exemplar selections of literature in fiction and nonfiction genres. Students read short stories, poems, a full-length novel, and a full-length Shakespeare play, analyzing the use of elements of literature in developing character, plot, and theme. For example, in selected stories, students compare the effect of setting on tone and character development. Likewise, in the poetry unit, students analyze how artists and writers draw from and interpret source material. Each unit includes informational texts inviting students to consider the historical, social, and literary context of the main texts they study. For example, in the first semester, a Nikolai Gogol story that is offered as an exemplar of magical realism is accompanied by instruction on that genre. Together, the lesson content and reading prompt students to demonstrate their understanding of magical realism by analyzing its qualities in a literary text. Throughout the course, students respond to others’ claims and support their own claims in essays, discussions, and presentations, consistently using thorough textual evidence. The range of texts includes canonical authors such as William Shakespeare, Franz Kafka, and Elie Wiesel, as well as writers from diverse backgrounds, such as Alice Walker, Li-Young Lee, and Robert Lake-Thom (Medicine Grizzly bear)
    • English 10

      • Description: The focus of the English 10 course is the writing process. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Each lesson culminates in a written assignment that lets students demonstrate their developing skill in one of these applications. English 10 follows the model of English 9 by including at least one anchor text per lesson, but the essays, articles, stories, poems, and speeches are often presented as models for students to emulate as they practice their own writing. So that these readings may serve as proper examples for students, a high proportion of texts for this course are original pieces. English 10 also continues to develop students’ reading, listening, and speaking skills. Readings include poems, stories, speeches, plays, and a graphic novel, as well as a variety of informational texts. The readings represent a wide variety of purposes and cultural perspectives, ranging from the Indian epic The Ramayana to accounts of Hurricane Katrina told through different media. Audio and video presentations enhance students’ awareness and command of rhetorical techniques and increase their understanding of writing for different audiences.
  • English 11

    • Description:  In the English 11 course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. They begin by studying the language of independence and the system of government developed by Thomas Jefferson and other enlightened thinkers. Next, they explore how the Romantics and Transcendentalists emphasized the power and responsibility of the individual in both supporting and questioning the government. Students consider whether the American Dream is stillachievable and examine the Modernists’ disillusionment with the idea that America is a “land of opportunity.” Reading the words of Frederick Douglass and the text of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Students explore how individuals cope with the influence of war and cultural tensions while trying to build and secure their own personal identity. Finally, students examine how technology is affecting our contemporary experience of freedom: Will we eventually change our beliefs about what it means to be an independent human being? In this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analytical essays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, students participate in discussions and prepare speeches. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way American literature represents the array of voices contributing to our multicultural identity.
  • English 12

    • Description: The English 12 course asks students to closely analyze world literature and consider how we humans define and interact with the unknown, the monstrous, and the heroic. In the epic poems The Odyssey, Beowulf, and The Inferno, in Shakespeare’s Tempest, in the satire of Swift, and in the rhetoric of World War II, students examine how the ideas of “heroic” and “monstrous” have been defined across cultures and time periods and how the treatment of the “other” can make monsters or heroes of us all. Reading Frankenstein and works from those who experienced the imperialism of the British Empire, students explore the notion of inner monstrosity and consider how the dominant culture can be seen as monstrous in its ostensibly heroic goal of enlightening the world. Throughout this course, students analyze a wide range of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. They build writing skills by composing analyticalessays, persuasive essays, personal narratives, and research papers. In order to develop speaking and listening skills, students participate in discussions and prepare speeches. Overall, students gain an understanding of the way world literature represents the array of voices that contribute to our global identity.
  • Expository Writing

    • Description:  In Expository Writing, students delve into the power and potential of the English language. Reading and writing assignments explore relevant and universal themes including war, human rights, cultural awareness, and humans’ relationships with the environment, the media, and technology. By reading and evaluating seminal speeches, essays, and stories, students learn how writing is used to explain, persuade, and entertain. Students develop and practice expressing their own ideas in four types of essays: compare and contrast, persuasive, evaluative, and explanatory. Additional assignments will focus on narrative writing, research projects, and speeches.Writing assignments vary in length and purpose, giving students a chance to demonstrate their skills in lesson-end assignments. In Unit 1, students evaluate a wartime speech, argue for or against a political course of action, and craft a speech adapted for two different audiences. Over the course of Unit 2, students build a research project addressing the causes and effects of the civil rights movement. Unit 3 gives students a chance to students to respond to texts and topics related to loyalty and cultural awareness through an argument, a narrative, and an analysis essay. In Unit 4, students write and publish an explanatory article about the environment, an argument about the impact of technology on society, and an analysis of multiple themes within a text.Through reading, writing, revising, discussing, and refining grammar and language skills, students develop the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively about relevant issues in the academic and professional worlds.
  • Algebra I

    • Description: Algebra I builds students’ command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include problem-solving with basic equations and formulas; an introduction to functions and problem solving; linear equations and systems of linear equations; exponents and exponential functions; sequences and functions; descriptive statistics; polynomials and factoring; quadratic equations and functions; and function transformations and inverses. This course supports students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical knowledge. Students discover new concepts through guided instruction and confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. A variety of activities allow for students to think mathematically in a variety of scenarios and tasks. In Discussions, students exchange and explain their mathematical ideas. Modeling activities ask them to analyze real-world scenarios and mathematical concepts. Journaling activities have students reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. And in Performance Tasks, students synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios, make sense of multifaceted problems, and persevere in solving them.
  • Algebra II

    • Description: Algebra II introduces students to advanced functions, with a focus on developing a strong conceptual grasp of the expressions that define them. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include quadratic equations; polynomial functions; rational expressions and equations; radical expressions and equations; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric identities and functions; modeling with functions; probability and inferential statistics; probability distributions; and sample distributions and confidence intervals. This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Financial Algebra

    • Description: Financial Algebra focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra 1 and Geometry to topics including personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning. Students then extend their investigations using more advanced mathematics, such as systems of equations (when studying cost and profit issues) and exponential functions (when calculating interest problems).
  • Geometry

    • Description: Geometry builds upon students’ command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability. This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Mathematics I

    • Description: Mathematics I builds students’ command of geometric knowledge and linear and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include relationships between quantities; linear and exponential relationships; reasoning with equations; descriptive statistics; congruence, proof, and constructions; and connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates. This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Mathematics II

    • Description: Mathematics II extends students’ geometric knowledge and introduces them to quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, exploring the relationship between these and their linear and exponential counterparts. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include extending the number system; quadratic functions and modeling; expressions and equations; applications of probability; similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and proof; and circles with and without coordinates. This course supports all students as they develop computational fluency and deepen conceptual understanding. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Mathematics III

    • Description: Mathematics III incorporates advanced functions, trigonometry, and probability and statistics as students synthesize their prior knowledge and solve increasingly challenging problems. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include formulating inferences and conclusions from data; polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry of general triangles and trigonometric functions; and mathematical modeling. This course supports all students as they simultaneously develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practice skills. Students begin each lesson by discovering new concepts through guided instruction, and then confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. Modeling activities equip students with tools for analyzing a variety of real-world scenarios and mathematical ideas. Journaling activities allow students to reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. Performance tasks prepare students to synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios and require that they make sense of multifaceted problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Pre-Calculus

    • Description:  Precalculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Within each Precalculus lesson, students are supplied with a post-study Checkup activity that provides them the opportunity to hone their computational skills by working through a low-stakes problem set before moving on to formal assessment. Unit-level Precalculus assessments include a computer-scored test and a scaffolded, teacher-scored test.
  • Statistics and Probability

    • Description: Statistics and Probability provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. Through a “Discovery-Confirmation-Practice”-based exploration of each concept, students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications. Course topics include types of data; common methods used to collect data; and the various representations of data, including histograms, bar graphs, box plots, and scatterplots. Students learn to work with data by analyzing and employing methods of prediction, specifically involving samples and populations, distributions, summarystatistics, regression analysis, transformations, simulations, and inference. Ideas involving probability — including sample space, empirical and theoretical probability, expected value, and independent and compound events — are covered as students explore the relationship between probability and data analysis. The basic connection between geometry and probability is also explored.
  • Biology

    • Description: Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment. The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.
  • Chemistry

    • Description: Chemistry offers a curriculum that emphasizes students’ understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, the importance of chemistry to society, atomic structure, bonding in matter, chemical reactions, redox reactions, electrochemistry, phases of matter, equilibrium and kinetics, acids and bases, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, nuclear reactions, organic chemistry, and alternative energy. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how chemistry concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills.
  • Earth Science

    • Description: Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth’s composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space. Course topics include an exploration of the major cycles that affect every aspect of life, including weather, climate, air movement, tectonics, volcanic eruptions, rocks, minerals, geologic history, Earth’s environment, sustainability, and energy resources. Optional teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.
  • Physical Science

    • Description: Physical Science offers a focused curriculum designed around the understanding of critical physical science concepts, including the nature and structure of matter, the characteristics of energy, and the mastery of critical scientific skills. Course topics include an introduction to kinematics, including gravity and two-dimensional motion; force; momentum; waves; electricity; atoms; the periodic table of elements; molecular bonding; chemical reactivity; gases; and an introduction to nuclear energy. Teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.
  • Environmental Studies

    • Description: Environmental Studies explores the biological, physical, and sociological principles related to the environment in which organisms live on Earth, the biosphere. Course topics include natural systems on Earth, biogeochemical cycles, the nature of matter and energy, the flow of matter and energy through living systems, populations, communities, ecosystems, ecological pyramids, renewable and non-renewable natural resources, land use, biodiversity, pollution, conservation, sustainability, and human impacts on the environment. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, deconstruct claims, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Case studies of current environmental challenges introduce each content lesson and acquaint students with real-life environmental issues, debates, and solutions. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Virtual Lab activities enable students to engage in investigations that require long periods of observation at remote locations and to explore simulations that enable environmental scientists to test predictions. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how biology, earth science, and physical science are applied to the study of the environment and how technology and engineering are contributing solutions for studying and creating a sustainable biosphere.
  • Physics

    • Description: Physics offers a curriculum that emphasizes students’ understanding of fundamental physics concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology. The course provides students with opportunities to learn and practice critical scientific skills within the context of relevant scientific questions. Topics include the nature of science, math for physics, energy, kinematics, force and motion, momentum, gravitation, chemistry for physics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, nuclear physics, quantum physics, and cosmology. Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts. Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Throughout this course, students are given an opportunity to understand how physics concepts are applied in technology and engineering. Journal and Practice activities provide additional opportunities for students to apply learned concepts and practice their writing skills.
  • Economics

    • Description: Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East. Economics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffolded series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. They also apply basic mathematics to economic concepts. Students read selections from annotated primary documents and apply those readings to the course content.
  • Ethnic Studies

    • Description: Ethnic Studies is a one-semester history and sociology course that examines the multicultural fabric of the United States. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences. Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures. In online Discussions and Polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences as well as those of others. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond using methods of inquiry from history, sociology, and psychology. Written assignments and Journals provide opportunities for students to practice and develop skills for thinking and communicating about race, culture, ethnicity, and identity.
  • Geography and World Cultures

    • Description: Geography and World Cultures offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Along the way, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them. Geography and World Cultures is built to state standards and informed by standards from the National Council for History Education, the National Center for History in the Schools, and the National Council for Social Studies. Geography and World Cultures is designed as the first course in the social studies sequence. It develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary documents.
  • U.S. Government and Politics

    • Description: In U.S. Government and Politics, students examine the history, principles, and function of the political system established by the U.S. Constitution. Starting with a basic introduction to the role of government in society and the philosophies at the heart of American democracy, this course provides students with the knowledge needed to be informed and empowered participants in the U.S. political system. Through critical reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments, students develop their capacity to conduct research, analyze sources, make arguments, and take informed action. In written assignments, students address critical questions about U.S. politics and the role of individual Americans in the politics and political organizations. In discussion activities, students respond to political opinions, take a position, and defend their own claims. Formative and summative assessments provide students — and teachers — with ample opportunities to check in, review, and evaluate students’ progress in the course.
  • U.S. History

    • Description: United States History and Geography begins with the establishment of European colonies in North America and then traces the nation’s history from post-Civil War to the present. Students examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system, then evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while simultaneously exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the “information revolution” affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups. The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.
  • World History

    • Description: In World History, Culture and Geography, students study the major turning points that shaped the modern world including the Enlightenment, industrialization, imperialism, nationalism, political revolutions, the world wars, the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. By presenting content from multiple perspectives and through diverse primary and secondary source materials, this course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of the modern era and prepares students to be active and informed citizens of the world. Through critical reading activities, feedback-rich instruction, and application-oriented assignments, students develop their capacity to conduct research, analyze sources, make arguments, and take informed action. In written assignments, students address critical questions about the history of the modern era. In discussion activities, students respond to diverse opinions, take positions, and defend their own claims. Formative and summative assessments provide students — and teachers — with ample opportunities to check in, review, and evaluate students’ progress in the course.
  • Spanish I

    • Description: Spanish I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.
  • Spanish II

    • Description: Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives – both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.
  • Spanish III

    • Description: In Spanish III, students build upon the skills and knowledge they acquired in Spanish I and II. The course presents new vocabulary and grammatical concepts in context while providing students with ample opportunities to review and expand upon the material they have learned previously. Students read and listen to authentic materials from newspapers, magazines, and television. The content is focused on contemporary and relevant topics such as urbanization and population growth in Latin American countries, global health concerns, jobs of the future, and scientific advancements. The materials engage students as they improve their command of Spanish. Students review the formation and use of regular and irregular verbs in the present and future tenses, as well as the use of reflexive particles and infinitives. They also expand their understanding of noun and adjective agreement, the comparative and superlative degree of adjectives, and the placement and use of direct and indirect objects and pronouns. Students expand their vocabulary through exposure to word roots and families, popular slang, the correct use of words that are often confused for one another, and review of concepts such as proper placement of accents and stress. Presentation of new materials is always followed by several interactive, online exercises, allowing students to master the material as they learn it. Teacherscored activities provide students with opportunities to use their new Spanish skills both orally and in writing. Discussion activities allow students to interact with their peers in the target language.
  • French I

    • Description: French I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.
  • French II

    • Description: French II teaches students to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives – both in formal and informal address. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace.
  • Art Appreciation

    • Description: Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course’s primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists that represent a variety of geographic locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about art critique to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art.
  • Music Appreciation

    • Description: Music Appreciation introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The course is offered in a two-semester format. The first semester covers primitive musical forms and classical music. The second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop. The course explores the interface of music and social movements and examines how the emergent global society and the Internet bring musical forms together in new ways from all around the world.
  • Physical Education 1

    • Description: Health Opportunities through Physical Education combines instruction in health and physical education in a full-year, integrated course. It focuses on developing skills, habits and attitudes to maintain a healthy lifestyle and applying lessons learned to physical fitness. Through active participation and real-world simulations, the course aims to demonstrate firsthand the value of conscientious lifestyle management.HOPE lays a foundation for making healthy decisions by building seven skills: accessing valid health information; analyzing internal and external influences; self-management; interpersonal communication; decision-making; goal setting; and advocacy. Students apply these skills to a variety of topics throughout the course, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety. Successful completion of this course will require parent/legal guardian sign-off on student-selected physical activities on weekly participation reports to verify the student is meeting his or her requirements and responsibilities.
  • Physical Education 2

    • Description: Health Opportunities through Physical Education combines instruction in health and physical education in a full-year, integrated course. It focuses on developing skills, habits and attitudes to maintain a healthy lifestyle and applying lessons learned to physical fitness. Through active participation and real-world simulations, the course aims to demonstrate firsthand the value of conscientious lifestyle management.HOPE lays a foundation for making healthy decisions by building seven skills: accessing valid health information; analyzing internal and external influences; self-management; interpersonal communication; decision-making; goal setting; and advocacy. Students apply these skills to a variety of topics throughout the course, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety. Successful completion of this course will require parent/legal guardian sign-off on student-selected physical activities on weekly participation reports to verify the student is meeting his or her requirements and responsibilities.
  • Health Education

    • Description: Health Education is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. Health Education helps students develop knowledge, attitudes, and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety. Through use of accessible information and project-based learning, students apply the skills they need to stay healthy. These skills include identifying and accessing valid health information, practicing self-management, identifying internal and external influences, communicating effectively, making healthy decisions, setting goals, and advocating. Students who complete Health Education build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.
  • Sociology

    • Description: Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies. Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification, social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists. In online discussions and polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences and ideas, as well as on the ideas of sociologists. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond, using methods of inquiry from sociology. Written assignments provide opportunities to practice and develop skills in thinking and communicating about human relationships, individual and group identity, and all other major course topics.
  • Psychology

    • Description: Psychology provides a solid overview of the field’s major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction.

Middle School Course List:


Course Name Total Credits
English 6 2 Semesters
English 7 2 Semesters
English 8 2 Semesters
Math 6 2 Semesters
Math 7 2 Semesters
Math 8 2 Semesters
Pre-algebra 2 Semesters
Algebra I 2 Semesters
MS Civics 2 Semesters
MS World History and Geography 2 Semesters
MS US History and Geography 2 Semesters
Integrated Science 6 2 Semesters
Integrated Science 7 2 Semesters
Integrated Science 8 2 Semesters
MS Life Science 2 Semesters
MS Earth Science 2 Semesters
MS Physical Science 2 Semesters
English Foundation I 2 Semesters
English Foundation II 2 Semesters
Reading Skills and Strategies 1 Semester
Writing Skills and Strategies 1 Semester

Middle School Course Descriptions:


  • English 6

    • Description: English 6 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students’ communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students’ critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to six lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • English 7

    • Description:  English 7 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students’ communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students’ critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to six lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • English 8

    • Description: English 8 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students’ communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students’ critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to six lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • Math 6

    • Description: Math 6 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. Course topics include ratios and rates, fraction and decimal operations, and signed numbers. Students continue to build their algebra skills by plotting points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane and solving equations and inequalities. Geometry topics include area, surface area, and volume, and statistical work features measures of center and variability, box plots, dot plots, and histograms.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments. By constantly honing the ability to apply their knowledge in abstract and real-world scenarios, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.
  • Math 7

    • Description: Math 7 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. Throughout the course, students gain a deep understanding of proportions and their use in solving problems. They extend their fluency with operations on rational numbers and translate among different forms of rational numbers. Algebra topics include simplifying and rewriting algebraic expressions and solving more complex equations and inequalities. Students also sketch geometric figures and explore scale drawings, investigate circle properties and angle relationships, and deepen their understanding of area, volume, and surface area. They see how statistics uses sample data to make predictions about populations and compare data from different data sets. Students gain a fundamental understanding of probability and explore different ways to find or estimate probabilities.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments. By constantly honing the ability to apply their knowledge in abstract and real-world scenarios, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.
  • Math 8

    • Description: Math 8 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. In this course, students focus on understanding functions — what they are, how to represent them in different ways, and how to write them to model mathematical and real-world situations. In particular, students investigate linear functions by learning about slope and slope-intercept form. Students’ understanding of linear functions is extended to statistics, where they make scatter plots and use linear functions to model data. They solve linear equations and equations involving roots, and explore systems of linear equations. Additional topics include exponents, powers of ten, scientific notation, and irrational numbers. Students learn about transformations, and extend that understanding to an investigation of congruence and similarity. Other geometric concepts explored include the Pythagorean theorem, angle relationships, and volumes of cylinders, cones, and spheres.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments. By constantly honing the ability to apply their knowledge in abstract and real-world scenarios, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.
  • Pre-Algebra

    • Description:  Pre-Algebra provides a curriculum focused on foundational concepts that prepare students for success in Algebra I. Through a “Discovery-Confirmation-Practice”-based exploration of basic concepts, students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, to deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and to extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.Course topics include integers; the language of algebra; solving equations with addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; fractions and decimals; measurement; exponents; solving equations with roots and powers; multi-step equations; and linear equations. Within each Pre-Algebra lesson, students are supplied with a scaffolded note-taking guide, called a Study Sheet, as well as a post-study Checkup activity that provides them the opportunity to hone their computational skills by working through a low-stakes, 10-question problem set before starting formal assessment. Unit-level Introductory Algebra assessments include a computer-scored test and a scaffolded, teacher-scored test.
  • Algebra I

    • Description: Algebra I builds students’ command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include problem-solving with basic equations and formulas; an introduction to functions and problem solving; linear equations and systems of linear equations; exponents and exponential functions; sequences and functions; descriptive statistics; polynomials and factoring; quadratic equations and functions; and function transformations and inverses. This course supports students as they develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical knowledge. Students discover new concepts through guided instruction and confirm their understanding in an interactive, feedback-rich environment. A variety of activities allow for students to think mathematically in a variety of scenarios and tasks. In Discussions, students exchange and explain their mathematical ideas. Modeling activities ask them to analyze real-world scenarios and mathematical concepts. Journaling activities have students reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct arguments, critique reasoning, and communicate precisely. And in Performance Tasks, students synthesize their knowledge in novel, real-world scenarios, make sense of multifaceted problems, and persevere in solving them.
  • MS Civics

    • Description: Middle School Civics delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students’ understanding of the political and governmental systems of the United States and the roles played by citizens. By honing their ability to analyze civic life, political practices, and government structures, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas about civics accessible through focused content, guided analysis, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • MS World History and Geography

    • Description: By constantly honing their ability to analyze history, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas about world history accessible through focused content, guided analysis, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • MS U.S. History and Geography

    • Description: Middle School U.S. History and Geography delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students’ knowledge of U.S. history, from the peopling of North America through the era of Reconstruction. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content. By constantly honing their ability to analyze history, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with three to five lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas about U.S. history accessible through focused content, guided analysis, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • Integrated Science 6

    • Description: California Middle School Grade 6 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as the flow of energy and matter through both living and nonliving systems, including Earth’s systems; Earth’s weather and climate; the interaction between humans and the environment; the relationship between structure and function; and growth, development, and reproduction in organisms.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • Integrated Science 7

    • Description: California Middle School Grade 7 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices.Students explore concepts such as the structures and properties of matter; chemical reactions; the flow of energy through systems, including Earth’s living and nonliving systems; and the history of Earth.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • Integrated Science 8

    • Description: California Middle School Grade 8 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as waves and electromagnetic radiation, energy and forces on Earth and in space, genetics and natural selection, engineering design, and the impact of humans on Earth’s resources.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • MS Life Science

    • Description: California Middle School Life Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including the relationship between structure and function, the flow of energy and matter through living systems, heredity, and the diversity of life.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • MS Earth Science

    • Description: Middle School Earth Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including Earth’s systems, engineering design, the nature of the universe, and the interaction between humans and the environment.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • MS Physical Science

    • Description: California Middle School Physical Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including the interactions of matter; motion and stability; waves and their technological applications; and energy.The two-semester course is arranged in themed units, each with two to three lessons. In each unit, activities make complex ideas accessible to students as they discover the nature of science through focused content, interactive mini-investigations, multi-modal representations, and personalized feedback. Each lesson includes a variety of activities such as direct instruction, application of skills, performance tasks, and formative and summative assessments. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content and demonstrate their learning through computer- and teacher-scored assignments.
  • English Foundations I

      • Description: English Foundations I supports adolescent literacy development at the critical stage between decoding and making meaning from text. Through intensive reading and writing skills instruction, deep practice sets, consistent formative feedback, graduated reading levels, and helpful strategy tips, the course leads students to improved comprehension and text handling. Semester 1 provides instruction in basic reading skills and vocabulary building. The student learns what a successful reader does to attack words and sentences and make meaning from them. Semester 2 provides instruction in basic writing skills, introduces academic tools, and demonstrates effective study skills. The student learns step-by-step processes for building effective paragraphs and learns how to use academic tools such as reference books and outlines. To provide additional support, the course uses text features and visual clues to draw students’ attention to important information. The use of text features is also designed to help students internalize strategies for comprehending informational text. Characters appear throughout the instruction to offer tips and fix-up strategies in an authentic, first-person, think-aloud format. Their inclusion makes transparent the reading processes that go on inside the mind of a successful reader. This extra metacognitive support serves to bolster student confidence and provide a model of process and perseverance. Numerous practice opportunities are provided in the form of assessments that move from no stakes to low stakes to high stakes throughout a unit. This practice is centered on authentic and age-appropriate passages that are written in a topical framework and use controlled syntax and vocabulary. The difficulty of these passages gradually increases from a 3rd- to 5th grade reading level over the duration of the course. Additional support is offered through significant formative feedback in practice and assessment. This course guides students through the reading, writing, and basic academic skills needed to prepare for success in academic coursework. At the end of the course, the student should be poised for continued success in the academic world.
  • English Foundations II

        • Description: English Foundations II offers a year of skill building and strategy development in reading and writing. Semester one is a reading program designed to help struggling readers develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy. Semester two is a writing program which builds confidence in composition fundamentals by focusing on the areas of composing, grammar, style, and media literacy. Both semesters are structured around ten mini-units which offer interactive instruction and guided practice in each of the four learning strands. Students read for a variety of purposes and write for a variety of audiences. The workshops stress high interest, engaging use of technology, relevant topics, and robustly scaffolded practice. Students learn to use different types of graphic organizers as they develop and internalize reading and writing process strategies. They build confidence as they develop skills and experience success on numerous low stakes assessments that encourage growth and reinforce learning.